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Facebook just hired a handful of its toughest privacy critics



Electronic Frontier Foundation Senior Staff Attorney Nate Cardozo Speaks onstage at TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2016 at Brooklyn Cruise Terminal on May 9, 2016 in New York City.
Enlarge / Electronic Frontier Foundation Senior Staff Attorney Nate Cardozo Speaks onstage at TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2016 at Brooklyn Cruise Terminal on May 9, 2016 in New York City.

Noam Galai / Getty Images for TechCrunch

At a time when Facebook has been under the pressure of a single one of its fiercest antagonists.

On Tuesday, Facebook has confirmed that he has been a senior official of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, who has been very publicly critical of the company in recent years.

In 2015, Cardozo once wrote in a book on Facebook "Business model depends on our collective confusion and apathy about privacy."

In addition to Cardozo, Facebook also hired attorney Robyn Greene, at the Open Technology Institute in Washington, DC, and Nathan White, who is set to leave his position at Access Now. (Full disclosure: Cardozo is a longtime friend of this author, and Greene is a blurb for this author's book.)

Cardozo will be working on WhatsApp and will be based in Menlo Park, California. The new hires will be working on the Washington, DC, office.

Facebook Declined to the New Hires available for Interviews and Explained in the Statement of the Ars.

Rob Sherman, Facebook's deputy chief privacy officer, said "We think it is important to bring in a new one."

He continued: "We hope that we will be able to do a better job. in the future and we're excited to have them onboard. "

Chris Hoofnagle, law professor at the University of California, Berkeley.

Facebook has been a private team in recent months. Melinda Claybaugh, who came to the company after serving the Federal Trade Commission.

That government agency is reportedly examining either Facebook broke an earlier consent decree. If so, the company could face millions in fines.


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