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Wild animals in the sky? Prehistoric cave art offers ancient modern astronomy



Some of the world's oldest beer paintings have shown how old people had a relatively high level of knowledge in astronomy.

Artwork across Europe is not just a wildlife appearance, as previously thought. Instead, the animal symbols depict constellations of constellations in the night sky and are used to represent dates and celebrate events such as comet strikes, suggests analysis.

Reproduction of Paleolithic Beer Colors from the Altamira Cave, Cantabria, Spain (reproduction), painted c. 20,000 years ago (solutrean). (Thomas Quine / CC BY SA 2.0)

Reproduction of Paleolithic Beer Colors from the Altamira Cave, Cantabria, Spain (reproduction), painted c. 20,000 years ago (solutrean). (Thomas Quine / CC BY SA 2.0)

Time tracking

They discover that maybe 40,000 years ago, people were watching time with knowledge of how the star's position slowly changed for thousands of years.

Opinions show that the ancient people understood the effects of the gradual transition of the Earth's rotational axis. The discovery of this phenomenon, called the preceding equinox, was previously credited to the ancient Greeks.

About a time when the Neanderthals became extinct and, probably, before humanity was in Western Europe, people can set dates for 250 years, according to a study.

Neanderthal Reconstruction at the Neanderthals Museum. (Public domain)

Neanderthal Reconstruction at the Neanderthals Museum. ( Public domain )

Ancient Advanced Astronomy Insights

Opinions show that the astronomical insights of ancient people were much higher than previously believed. Their knowledge can help open naval navigation, which affects our understanding of the prehistoric migration.

Researchers from the universities of Edinburgh and Kent studied information on palaeolithic and neolithic art featuring animal symbols in the territories of Turkey, Spain, France and Germany.

They found that all sites used the same data retention method based on sophisticated astronomy, although art was removed during tens of thousands of years.

Proofs on major prehistoric sites

The researchers found earlier studies on stone carvings at one of these sites – Gobekli Tepe in modern Turkey – which is interpreted as a monument to a devastating comet strike about 11,000 years before Christ. It is believed that this strike has begun a minimal ice age, known as the Last Dry Day.

Vulture-Stone Gbbekli Tepe. Credit: Alistair Kumbs

They also decoded what probably is the most popular piece of ancient art – Lascaux Shaft Scene in France. Researchers recommend: A work involving a deceased person and several animals may mention another comet strike of about 15 200 m.p.

Lascaux 4, Montignac, Dordogne, France. The pictures are taken on a part called the atelier. (Public domain)

Lascaux 4, Montignac, Dordogne, France. The pictures are taken on a part called the atelier. (Public domain)

The team confirmed its findings by comparing the age of many examples of beer artifacts familiar with the familiarity of chemically-used colors – with hundreds of ancient times as seen by sophisticated software.

It was found that the world's oldest sculptures, the Hohlenstein-Stadel Cave Lion, from 38,000 BC, were consistent with this ancient time tracking system.

Hohlenstein-Stadel area is a Lyon man. (Dagmar Hollmann / CC BY SA 4.0)

Hohlenstein-Stadel area is a Lyon man. (Dagmar Hollmann / CC BY SA 4.0)

This study was published in 2008 Athenian History Journal .

Edinburgh Technical School University Martin Sweatman, who led the study, said:

"The art of the early cave shows that during the last ice age, people were more discerning about the night sky, and intellectually today they almost did not differ. These findings confirm the theory of the effects of different comets on human development and may radically transform prehistoric populations."

Top Image: Some of the world's oldest beer paintings revealed that people had an old but progressive astronomy. An Edinburgh University study suggests that animal symbols create constellations of constellations in the night sky and are used to celebrate dates and events, such as comet strikes. Source: Alistair Kumbs

Initially ScienceDaily appeared in an article originally titled "Prehistoric cave art proves the use of sophisticated astronomy."

Edinburgh University "The art of prehistoric cave shows the use of sophisticated astronomy." ScienceDaily ScienceDaily, November 27, 2018.

References

Martin B. Sweatman, Alistair Kumbs. " European Palaeolithic Art Decoding: An Extensive Knowledge of the Pre-Equinox . " Athenian History Journal , 2018. Available at https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.00046


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