Saturday , March 6 2021

This week is the World Antibiotics Week



This week is the World Antibiotics Week. We have chosen the 5 most popular articles on reducing antibiotics in livestock.

Every November, the World Antibiotics Week (WAAW) seeks to increase the global awareness of antibiotic resistance (AMR) and promote best practices among the general public, healthcare providers and policymakers to prevent the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. This year, the WAAV is from 12 to 18 November.

Since their discovery, antibiotics have become the cornerstone of modern medicine. However, the persistent use of antibiotics and the abuse of human and animal health have contributed to the emergence and spread of AMR. Photo: PXhere

Since their discovery, antibiotics have become the cornerstone of modern medicine. However, the persistent use of antibiotics and the abuse of human and animal health have contributed to the emergence and spread of AMR. Photo: PXhere

Reducing the global level

Since their discovery, antibiotics have become the cornerstone of modern medicine. However, the persistent over-use and misuse of antibiotics in human and animal health have contributed to the emergence and spread of AMR that occurs when microbes, such as bacteria, become resistant to medicinal products that they are treating. At the global level, great efforts are being made to reduce the prophylactic and unnecessary use of antimicrobials. Animal breeding has therefore become a very popular use of natural solutions, such as the use of nutritional additives.

Promising solutions for animals

All about feed has reported a reduction in antibiotics for many years. Here are some of the best read articles.

http://www.allaboutfeed.net/ Antibiotic reductions mean cultural change

In order to reduce the amount of antibiotics or antibiotics free, cultural change needs to be implemented, and more importantly, this change must be covered. He also added that this means that technology and innovation must be implemented. Communication and transparency for consumers are also very important. This was announced by President of Animal Catering Company Kemin, Chris Nelson. The event gave a number of floor experts to share their thoughts on what is needed to continue reducing antibiotics. Read the full article here.

http://www.allaboutfeed.net/ Antimicrobial resistance is not completely new

In another event organized by Amlan International, Dr Margie Lee said that the association between antibacterial resistance and antibiotic use in animals is not so simple. She stressed that antibacterial resistance (AMR) is not a new thing, but it happens in nature for thousands or even millions of years. This is because antibacterial compounds are natural. If, for example, mushrooms produce mycotoxins, the released intermediates are antimicrobial. Therefore, ancient Chinese medicine reports the treatment of infections with fungi grown in soy beans. If there are antibacterials, the bacteria become resistant. Read the full article here.

http://www.allaboutfeed.net/ The next big thing is Antibiotic never

Antibiotic cuts are one thing, but big poultry producers in the United States move to any antibiotic. This means that all animals, from the incubator or from birth to slaughter, are not treated with antibiotics. This term is really a take-off in the United States, as explained by Mike Leventini of Perdue Foods, one of the largest poultry producers in the United States. From 2017, Perdue is a NAI bird. We talked to Mike about this movement and why it was not very difficult for him. Read the full article here.

http://www.allaboutfeed.net/ The promising effect of plant extracts

Fodder feed additives or herbal extracts are mainly used as antimicrobial and digestibility enhancers and are often considered one of the most promising feed additives to replace "antimicrobials." According to a survey conducted between veterinarians, diet doctors and scientists, it seems that these products are very popular in the Asia-Pacific region. Read the full article here.

http://www.allaboutfeed.net/ Using quorum sensor technology

The first reaction to cure an infection is to kill the bacteria that causes it. But there is an increasing group of experts who believe that killing is not in itself correct. Antibiotic (antimicrobials) activity destroys bacteria and there is a risk that some people can survive, become stronger and less susceptible. A new way to redirect bad bacteria is to interfere with the communication system between pathogenic bacteria, making them less virulent. This is called quorum sensor technology. Read the full article here.


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