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Unexpectedly good night, brain toxic protein increased by 50%: insomnia can contribute to Alzheimer's disease |



Scientists have long known that poor quality of sleep is associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about how insomnia accelerates brain damage. Now, the University of Washington Medical School team has discovered the main mechanism: if there is no rest in the evening, the Tau protein content in the brain will increase significantly overnight, and it may accumulate in the long run as a precursor to brain damage.

The progression of Alzheimer's disease is linked to the accumulation of amyloid beta and Tau in the brain, and both sticky plates can kill nerve cells and affect memory. With the ability to perform.

Last year, a study of 20 healthy adults found that only during the night of sleep, the amount of beta-amyloid in the brain increased significantly, especially in the right hippocampus associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease (well Hippocampus) and the thalamus.

Now, the University of Washington Medical School Research Group has found that sleeplessness overnight, it also causes a rapid increase in tau content in the brain by 50%.

Tau protein is found in the brain of healthy people, but under certain conditions Tau proteins begin to aggregate and form neurofibrillary tangles in nerve cells, causing microtubules of nerve cells to collapse and collapse of other cytoskeleton systems. Bad, causing blurred communication between nerve cells and ending with nerve cell death.

So-called "specific circumstances" could include insomnia.

The new study conducted two experiments with mice and humans: the mice were divided into two groups: one group lay in normal physiological time, and the other group was awake for a long time every day, after 4 weeks the researchers discovered that they did not expect well. More Tau protein was found in the mouse brain and mixed with fibers, and the site of accumulation was the same as Alzheimer's disease.

In human experiments, Brendan Lucey, a professor of neuropathology, obtained two brain fluids from eight subjects: one was removed after normal sleep and the other after overnight, the same after measuring 50% increase in Tau protein content in the brain.

Both experimental studies have shown that tau is often released during awakening and asleep when the sleep cycle is interrupted during sleep, leading to accumulation of tau protein and may begin to accumulate in the fibers of harmful fibers.

As more studies point to a positive relationship between poor sleep quality and Alzheimer's disease, it is concluded that the brain should be well protected during sleep. The new document was published in Science.

(Source: pixabay)

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