Monday , March 1 2021

Amazon Battles New York City, Washington D.C. area for new offices



SAN FRANCISCO / WASHINGTON: Amazon.com Inc. has won America's financial and political capital for big new offices on Tuesday, separating its home in Seattle, with plans to create more than 25,000 jobs in both New York and outside Washington. DC

The world's largest online retailer plans to spend $ 5 billion on two new events in Long Island and Arlington, Virginia, and plans to receive more than $ 2 billion in tax rebates and incentives with plans to sign up more.

The award, which Amazon called HQ2, received hundreds of proposals from all over North America over the years following the war which widely circulated the public. Amazon ended up with foolishness by dividing the fine between the two most powerful East Coast U.S. cities and offering a 5,000 People Center Recovery Award in Nashville, Tennessee, focusing on technology and retail management management.

They said unsuccessfully they learned from the process, but the winners said it was expensive but useful.

"You either create jobs or you lose a job," said New York Governor Andrew Kuomo on Tuesday.

With over 610,000 employees worldwide Amazon is already one of the largest employers in the United States and the third most valuable company in the world, behind Apple Inc. and Microsoft Corp.

Still, it faces strong competition talent from Alfabet Inc. Google and other companies working to create a new technology in the cloud. These contenders regularly offer free food and perks in sunny California, which many consider to be better off than the Amazonian relative economic situation in rainy Seattle. Google is also increasingly influencing New York.

Already selling its upcoming Queens state of New York, Amazon spoke about Long Island City brewery, water park parks and convenient transit access. The rent is usually lower than Midtown Manhattan, which is just across the East River. The former industrial area also has a clock that covers hours before the end of US President Donald Trump.

Arlington, Virginia, across the Potomac River from the center of Washington, was able to choose Amazon's greater political influence in the US capital, where it has one of the largest lobby stores in the city. A location near the Pentagon may also help Amazon win a $ 10 billion cloud computing contract from the US Department of Defense, said Michael Pachter, an analyst at Wedbush Securities.

Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon and the richest person in the world, are privately owned by the Washington Post, which writes critics for Brief. In turn, the companies of Bezosa have often set goals for the president. The newspaper maintains complete editorial independence from its owner.

Amazon's choice is largely bypassing the United States, where many cities had hoped to economically increase and offer new jobs. The company already had a large number of corporate staff in Washington and New York.

"My heart today is broken," said Mayor of Dallas, Mike Rowling.

TAX BREAKS

At the start of last year's search, Amazon said it was looking for a business-friendly environment. The company said it would receive operating incentives of $ 1.525 billion out of New York, including an average of $ 48,000 per job created.

It can also be applied to other tax incentives, such as the New York Removal and Employment Assistance Program, which offers tax deductions worth $ 900 million over 12 years. The beneficiaries would have been in fact unclear to the company.

In Virginia, Amazon will receive $ 573 million in incentives, including $ 22,000 on average for each job created.

According to a database from Washington-based Heartwork Good Jobs First, this reward relates to the $ 1.6 billion subsidy that Amazon has received throughout the United States since 2000.

Amazone says it has invested $ 160 billion since 2010 and that new offices will generate more than $ 14 billion in additional tax revenues in New York, Virginia and Tennessee over the next two decades.

It expects an average salary of more than $ 150,000 in each new office.

CRISIS HOUSE

Amazon's focus on new, high-paying jobs has gained publicity, as it faces criticism of low wages in its vast stores.

According to media assessment and analysis firm mediaQuant Inc. In the two months since its launch in September last year, the company received media coverage of $ 148 million in the English press.

Amazon received 238 proposals, and 18 other finalists broke out in New York and Virginia from the January list, which also included Los Angeles and Chicago.

New Jersey started the contest by offering US $ 7 billion in potential public and city tax credits if Amazon is based in Newark and will be liable.

Others with lower offerings offered more creative approaches: Jonas Larry, the mayor of Stonecrest's Atlanta Suburb, said he would create a new city from an industrial land called Amazon, and her name lives in Bezos.

Assessing its capabilities, Amazon looked at the quality of schools, met with leaders to discuss education in science and math. Amazon also wanted the helicopter landing pads to be located in new places, and documents that it issued on Tuesday.

The company has already had to address community issues in over 45,000 people in the city of Seattle. The affordable housing crisis encouraged the city council to adopt the head tax in May, which Amazon helped transfer to the next city council vote.

Some critics have called for more transparency from cities and countries in the bidding process, warning that the benefits of having a large Amazon office can not compensate taxpayer-sponsored incentives and other costs.

"Our metro is damaged, our children are lacking in school seats, and too many of our neighbors lack adequate health care," said Michael Gianar, New York State Senator, and Jimmy Van Bramer, a city council member. "It's hard to understand that, in the face of these problems, we will sign a $ 3 billion check from Amazon."

Amazon shares closed at 0.3 percent, reaching $ 1,631.17, providing the company with a market value of nearly $ 800 billion.

(Report by Jeffrey Dastin in San Francisco and David Shepardson in Washington, further reports from Arjuna Panchadar and Supantha Mukherjee in Bengaluru, Angela Moon, Hilary Russ and Laila Kearney in New York, Suzannah Gonzalez and Karen Pierog in Chicago; article by Nick Zieminsky; Editing by Meredith Mazzilli and Bill Rigby)


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