Tuesday , March 21 2023

Netflix Language Crime in Mexico



[ad_1]

The Mexican Alfonso Cuaron film was released in Spain along with subtitles that translated the local Spanish into a "neutral" Spanish language, causing disputes on both sides of the Atlantic.

Sandrine Morel Published today at 03:51, updated 03:51

Time Reading 4 min.

Subscriber article

LETTER FROM MADRID

Translate "mamá" with "madre", "ustedes" with "vosotros", "enojarse" with "enfadarse", "vengan" with "venid" or small mexican pastry "Gansitos" produced by Spanish cheese crackers "Ganchitos". And a lot of the audience and the director are angry. Here is a summary of Netflix and Spain's striking decision to sign the Mexican film Alfonso Cuarón, Rome, from Spanish … to Spanish.

As it was sent by the daily newspaper El PaisA week ago, in Spain, where five cinemas showcased a movie at the Lion D & Or Venice Festival, and five cinemas were in dispute. December 2018 and the Netflix platform that has been producing since December 14.

In mid-December, Mexican writer Jordi Soler was the first to publicly and firmly criticize Twitter for the decision to subtitle a film with a Spanish who wants to be "neutral". "Paternalistic, offensive and deep provincial". The author, based in Barcelona, ​​saw the movie titled with a cinema version and had no choice but to support subtitles, a symbol for him colonialism »Linguistics.

Read also "Rome": An excellent intimate review of Mexican childhood

Directed by Alfonso Cuaron on January 8th in New York, where he was invited to retrospectively review his work "Attack on Spanish Society". "Color, texture and empathy work without subtitles, he added, obviously upset, to the EFE news agency. I like Mexican cinema [de l’Espagnol] Almodovar and I don't need subtitles in Mexico to understand it. "

Madeleine de Proust

The decision is all the more surprising, as the Spaniards have long rejected the Mexican accent. This singing pronunciation is a small Proust madeleine from all those over 40 years old. She transports them to childhood, when most of the cartoons they saw on television were dubbed in Mexico City. Starting with Walt Disney Movies; they often remember the charm that this accent gave to Snow White and Cinderella.

[ad_2]
Source link