Saturday , March 6 2021

Malaria, disease without destruction



Anopheles mosquitoes with one bite can carry a parasite that causes malaria or malaria. The person does not know the border or the boundaries. Their females look for blood to feed their offspring and go from body to body, which transmits the disease during a very complicated cycle to eliminate it. But not impossible

Panama Malaria is a poor disease, and most cases have been reported among the local population.

Parasites that carry malaria are five species, according to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), but two of the most dangerous are Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum, which can worsen the patient's health and lead to death

The epidemiological data from the Ministry of Health (Minsa) indicate that Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum are prevalent in the country, and comparing the incidence of those diseases that were reported by October of this year with those reported in the same month last year will be 48 cases. In 2017 there were 531, but this year the figure increased to 579.

This latest report also points out that the increase is expected to be due to an increase in malaria, as outbreaks of Plasmonium vivax in the Tyra River communities in the Guna Yala region (La Miel, Puerto Obaldía and Playón Chico) and the Ngäbe in Buglé and the Colón region.

Challenge

Faced with this situation, Minsa and the Gorgan Institute for the Study of Health (IECGES) undertook to eradicate malaria in 2020 as part of the Strategic Plan for the Elimination of Malaria (PEEM), signed last April between health authorities and PAHO, which are proposing the necessary actions to eliminate local affairs in the country.

Among the measures to be taken are the active search, inalienable approach, community orientation and domestic spraying.

Epidemiological data show that 549 autohitonal cases and 30 imported malaria cases were reported by October last year. Throughout 2017 there were 599 autochthon cases and 31 imported cases, namely 630 people were ill.

In this regard, the Department of Epidemiology at Mins reported that cases of illness still persist in local areas as they were not able to eradicate malaria.

Moreover, the main problem they face is the language gap between the indigenous population and the number of health officials arriving in these regions through prevention and control programs.

Epidemiologists reported that they showed weaknesses in diagnostics, treatment, research and response in workshops with departments, and therefore PEEM relied on these aspects.

Eric Ulloa, Deputy Health Minister, explained that, as a country, we are not moving ahead not only against the mosquito fight, but also against the vector; but actively looking for cases in which we need to work together with the community, promoters and associations to actively search for things and treat them quickly to reduce the transmission.

He added that there are some barriers, such as the prevalence of endemic areas, endemic areas within international boundaries, including the sociocultural characteristics of local people.

Recommendations and research

At the same time Icges scientist Nicanor Obaldía III Involving MINES, the Ministry of the Interior, representatives of the Ministry of Indigenous Affairs and other bodies, suggested using a multidisciplinary approach to drive endeavors (improving housing and drainage systems, and removing fumigation and bird breeding sites). mosquitoes).

He claimed that they were carrying out a study that they thought was part of a base to initiate the introduction of a molecular epidemiological surveillance system for imported or renewable parasites in Panama and Mesoamerica. [desde la península de Yucatán en México, Centroamérica y Panamá].

The researcher pointed out that the proposal intends to identify genetic diversity and population structure in order to understand the epidemiology or dynamics of the disease as well as its transmission biology, which are key elements for the successful implementation of the eradication program.

De Obaldía III confirmed that the original results of the study were named Panama population genetic diversity and population structure of human malaria parasites they indicate that Panama's circulating Plasmodium vivax parasite was in the "clone" phase (highly related genetically or interlinked) between 2007 and 2012, which indicates low diversity and, therefore, low transmission. These results indicate progress in eliminating them.


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