Monday , October 25 2021

Running cars could cost a loss of $ 50 million



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According to analysts, the damage caused by a fleeing freight train that was damaged after a deliberate disembarkation in Rhine Australia, driving 92 km without its driver, could reach USD 50 million.

The BHP Billiton-based train driver was yesterday to check the issue with one of his 268 wagons yesterday when it was from her to Newman on the Port Hedland line in the remote Pilbara region.

After reaching the estimated speeds of up to 180 km / h, the mining group decided to demolish a kilometer vehicle, wagons being discarded from the tracks and losing millions of dollars in iron rust.

The losses of the BHP Billiton iron ore train, which were deliberately damaged 119 km from Port Hedland, could rapidly rise to many millions.
The losses of the BHP Billiton iron ore train, which were deliberately damaged 119 km from Port Hedland, could rapidly rise to many millions. (9 news)

"We will add all the numbers together and we could receive $ 50 million (for damages)," said mineral analyst Tim Treadgold 9 News.

"It's either a man's mistake – the driver forgot the hand brake – is it a computer that can not handle your train.

"What happened to the dead man on this train – who should have stopped the train? It did not seem that the train was accelerating."

After leaving the train driver to check one of his 268 wagons, the freight without him went to Newman on the Port Hedland line in Western Australia.
After leaving the train driver to check one of his 268 wagons, the freight without him went to Newman on the Port Hedland line in Western Australia. (9 news)
After 50 minutes of deliberations, BHP decided to force it away and remove it from the rails to avoid traveling.
After 50 minutes of deliberations, BHP decided to force it away and remove it from the rails to avoid traveling. (9 news)

The traction wreck currently stops at 119 km from Port Hedland, where the BHP Control Center deploys it from the track after 50 consultations.

Nobody injured from the rails.

BHP iron ore operations have since been suspended while the incident is being investigated internally and has tested the site of an accident.

BHP's iron ore operations have since been stopped off the rails, but the company has said it has enough supplies to continue production throughout the country.
BHP's iron ore operations have since been stopped off the rails, but the company has said it has enough supplies to continue production throughout the country. (9 news)

It is believed that the accident is damaged more than a kilometer route, and the clearance of wagons from anywhere will take about a week.

Despite this, BHP has said that there is enough iron ore in Port Hedland to continue operating around Western Australia.

In the meantime, railing has further contributed to the debate about automated train systems used by mining companies.

Subsequently, this incident has contributed to the negotiation of automated trains without delay in the discussions on security and jobs.
Subsequently, this incident has contributed to the negotiation of automated trains without delay in the discussions on security and jobs. (Train running 92 km.)

With rival giant Rio Tinto already using completely non-controllable trains, there are claims that automatic wagons can be a safer option.

"I've seen that intelligent transportation kits work – they seem to be very, very secure," said WA Premier Mark McGowan.

"In the case of trains, it seems to me that it is the same."

The train deliberately faltered at several points along the track. (9 news)

Representatives of the CFMEU are not so sure, saying that the systems could pose a threat to workplaces and security.

"The uncertainty that it creates for people with their jobs and employment continues," said 9News Greg Busson of CFMEU.

"Then it is a safety aspect for people in remote areas that trains are controlled from the central situation in Perth."

This week's incident is also not the first time a BHP train gets into songs.

In 2015, 25 vehicles drove the same train line and locked the tracks in both directions. Last February, another 40 cars traveled 40 kilometers from Port Hedland.

© Nine Digital Pty Ltd 2018

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