Sunday , February 28 2021

"Mom, I Think I Die": A Diagnosis of a Popular Teacher's Shock



She simply said, "Mom, I think I'm dying."

Almost a week since Delwyn Shepherd-Frame and her daughter, Kiri Shepherd, had turned their lives backwards.

What doctors originally thought could be tick bite was the devastating Guillain-Barre syndrome diagnosis Kiri, a 42-year-old popular teacher working at Sunshine Coast University.

Delwyn recalled terrible observation until diagnosis.

She said that Kiri complained of headaches last Monday in the evening, which continued until Tuesday when all parts of her body began to break.

BEST DAYS: Letter from Shepherd (L) and her mother to Delwyn Shepherd-Frame this year.

BEST DAYS: Letter from Shepherd (L) and her mother to Delwyn Shepherd-Frame this year. Filed

Last Wednesday, pins and needles were unmoved, and she fought for a conversation.

"It was just as she reached paralysis in her mouth," Delwyn said.

"She could not walk."

Doctors first thought of tick boring, vitamin B12 deficiency or even stroke.

"The next day she thought she was going to die," Delwyn said.

"It was frightening."

The letter returned to doctors on Thursday who told her she might have multiple sclerosis, but the MRI scan appeared clearly.

So she was cut off at the hospital on Friday when she stated that she "did not leave here until you dislike me, which is wrong with me."

Lumbar puncture was performed and the doctors suggested that they were all just some of the Kiri was Guillain-Barre's syndrome, an autoimmune disease when the body's immune system attacks the peripheral nervous system.

(L-R) Renee Farrar and Kiri Shepherd cooking food to volunteer to help QLD flood from Caboolture to Brisbane and Goodna.
Photo: Cade Mooney / Sunshine Coast Daily

(L-R) Renee Farrar and Kiri Shepherd cooking food to volunteer to help QLD flood from Caboolture to Brisbane and Goodna.
Photo: Cade Mooney / Sunshine Coast Daily
Cade Mooney / cm196837

Delwyn said they told me that the Sunshine Coast University Hospital deals with only three cases a year, and the average recovery time for nerve cells was about four months.

But in some cases there were even two or more years, and in rare cases, patients had never recovered completely.

They had no indication of how long Kiri would have recovered, but Delvin said that her daughter had some positive signs and had the hope that she would be able to remove the fan in the coming days.

She was placed in an intensive care unit because she suffered from asthma and was unable to breathe herself.

The letter received physiotherapy twice a day and was given medications to improve immunity and to combat the condition that was usually caused by a virus or bacterial infection.

"She will also need speech therapy," said Delvin.

This was another blow to Kiri for what has been difficult in recent years.

A triple-degree holder who wanted to hope to complete a doctorate the following year, moved to Glass House Mountains with her mother to help Delwyn recover from cancer after diagnosis three years ago.

The letter helped take care of her mother by working on her 1.2ha property and taking care of Delwyn's wheelchair-related father before she was killed in a rare state.

"She has always been there, she has always been a good supporter," Delwyn said.

"She is very popular, she is always given to people."

The letter has started borrowing funds to help her pay her bills while she has lowered her income, and Delwyn, the retired person himself, tried to get a mandate to help arrange her daughter's finances while she was recovering.

Donate to Gofundme.com and look for Kiri Shepherd GBS support.


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